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Barry Shore

Music Uniting People

The Ambassador of JOY, Barry Shore, is SINGING as he introduces the founder of Big Muse, Peter Himmelman. Peter is a Grammy and Emmy nominated singer-songwriter, visual artist, best-selling author, film composer, entrepreneur, and rock and roll performer with over 20 critically acclaimed recordings to his credit. His soul helps organizations such as UPENN, 3M, Adobe and GAP leverage the power of their people’s innate creativity. You’ll LEAN IN as Barry and Peter touch Your Inner Being with mirth, song, and stories. You’ll Gladly SHARE this with at least 5 People You Love.

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Show Notes:

  • 00:45 – Barry’s rousing introduction
  • 14:17 – Peter Himmelman  on Music Uniting People
  • 24:40 – What’s Synesthesia?
  • 41:55 – The power of the intentions.
  • 52:21- Barry’s Interesting Wrap-up

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Barry Shore:

I can’t think of anybody that inspires noble deeds that I want to share with you more than Peter Himmelman. Peter, say hello to 352,817 people around the world.

Peter Himmelman:

I want to especially point out that 171617 was the last person. Sometimes you [crosstalk: 09:40].

Barry Shore:

He is classic Himmelman.

Peter Himmelman:

I want a center in my head so it looks something like Barry Shore’s. You got a lot of wonderful acronyms.

Barry Shore:

Well, we got a lot more coming your way kid because you inspire goodness. You inspire hope in people. Hope stands for helping others progress every day. Because that’s really what you do. A little inside baseball stuff. So, I’ve known Peter for at least four decades. Now, he may not remember all the time. But we met a number of times when he was in Santa Monica and such. And I’ve been a follower of his, not really a groupie but a follower of his not just his music but his films, his insights. He’s a creative guy. He is creativity. That’s what he does. He goes to sleep with his guitar, his wife doesn’t like it but he does. He goes to sleep with his guitar, and he gets up with his guitar and he starts plucking. Hell, I won’t say anything else he just plucks. But let’s jump right in, Peter because if I start telling everybody what you’ve done over the past number of decades it would take the rest of the show. But I really want to dig into something that grabs my very being. And that is if you’d be so kind to play a little bit, maybe one of your theme songs. And then let’s talk about the big muse. Because to me, it grabs the whole being. And if there is anything that we need coming out of this pandemic, this panic, it’s you.

Peter Himmelman:

Wow. I didn’t even realize I was going to be on your show today. I didn’t even know what it was. And I’m just like Barry Shore has got this thing. I thought we were just going to be talking on the phone. So let me see if I have the proper equipment for the proper song. Why don’t you do me a favor? Why don’t you just name any topic and I’ll make up a song about it. Of course, your 350,817 people might think we planned this in advance but you have to just trust us. [Crosstalk: 11:51] ambassador of joy is.

Barry Shore:

Yes. Let’s do this. This is so funny. Peter, you just froze. I’m loving it. 

Peter Himmelman:

You see what happens when you really get crazy. Is it unfrozen now?

Barry Shore:

You’re unfrozen. We might make a movie out of that. We’ll call it unfrozen. So let’s make a song about breathing.

Peter Himmelman:

Alright, that’s good. That might be hard but I’ll try. I’m sitting around my room, I’m saying to myself, oh, boy. I’m talking to the very Ambassador of Joy. Now the opposite of breath we won’t even say the word. We won’t say if here because I’m clear this is about joy. And I’m feeling good on the Barry show. And there’s one thing on know his beard is almost white as snow and I got to say there’s still a touch of gray, still a black that clouds him up but all I know is got love in his cup. He’s the Ambassador of Hoy. Oh boy, he plays with life like a toy but it’s a serious toy to him. He’s handsome and he’s slim, and I know he likes to swim because I just saw it in the video. All I can say is he’s got a kind of Hawaiian shirt. It’s so delicate and beautiful it almost makes my eyes hurt. And my eyes can tear up from the joy that I feel, and sometimes it’s so stimulating it doesn’t even feel real. And I’m talking about the man I can’t even say more. I’m talking about this handsome man his name is Barry Shore. That’s the best I could do with the time I had. 

Barry Shore:

Considering that we rehearsed that six times already I think you did an excellent job. Everybody should know that was the muse channeling through Peter. And it’s exactly what he did. That was on the spot and spot on. Baby, outstanding. By the way, a little insight baseball stuff on this shirt. This shirt is a tribute to a guy named Moshe Sivak [SP]

Peter Himmelman:

Oh yeah, Moshe Sivak. All of a Shalom.

Barry Shore:

I just realized as I’m saying the words there’s a whole story but we won’t talk about it now. But I just want everybody to hear what Peter just did is really the essence of Peter. See, Peter’s life is not just music but song, film, and anything to do with touching people at the very solar plexus of their soul. The very essence comes through. I would like to just jump in on something, Peter, that to me is so fascinating, because I don’t think there are 17 people right now that are listening, and not that they don’t know anything but this word, synesthesia.

Peter Himmelman:

Synesthesia.

Barry Shore:

Yes, synesthesia. It’s almost Italian but it’s not. I’m going to read the definition and then I want you to speak about it because it’s something to me, it’s fascinating because it touches everybody in the world. And that’s when the ideas, hearing music, and seeing colors in your mind at the same time. Is that fair to say?

Peter Himmelman:

Synesthesia is actually considered a disease when people have it to such an extent that it’s hard for them to function in the world. They taste things, and they hear music, or they see something and they’re hearing sound. It’s a sensory mix-up. But the way that I think about, and I think I have a touch of it, I think all people do. For example, when musicians are getting together, all musicians have it. All the good ones that I played with have had a touch of this. And you said something, can you play it so it sounds a little more opaque, or give it more of a verdant green sound, which sounds kind of crazy because sound doesn’t really have color. But everybody knows what you mean. Give it a lighter sound. Give it a darker, heavier sound. To take it a couple of steps further maybe into this idea of creativity, which we didn’t prepare for this so I’m just riffing. But the reason that one is able to do this when you’re in a creative zone, let’s say is because the normal rigid patterns that we function in, which mostly compel us, many times they’re an internal judgment, and they keep us in a very fearful place. Now, that judgment is designed to save us from a rabid Puma, a poisonous snake, or some sort of violent thing. But God willing we don’t really have those things very often. And this internal critic works way too hard. I have my own acronym for this critic. I call him Marv, majorly afraid of revealing vulnerability. 

Barry Shore:

I want you to repeat that one more time, please. 

Peter Himmelman:

Yeah. Majorly afraid of revealing vulnerability. I wrote a book. I wasn’t here to show my book. But in 2016, I wrote this book called “Let me out.” And Marv is a main figure in the book. And what Marv does is, as I said, He protects us from danger. But so many times the great majority of our life we’re not in danger. I’m on your show, and I’m riffing a song and it could go bad, who knows. But once you start something particularly new, we’re talking about purpose-driven lives, once you start something with the intention, not for self-aggrandizement, and ego-stroking, although that always is part of it. But when the majority of what you do is to uplift somebody, to gladden somebody, I riffed off that song part of what was fueling me because I didn’t really know this about you that you went through this very traumatic experience and your sincerity and uplifting people, which I didn’t really know anything about you until this moment. I feel very inclined to add what I can do. So, the energy that is encountered when one is doing something for purposes of bringing joy and hope, and I want to say a couple of things more about that in a second. That energy is strong enough to tell this Marv character, I think I have a picture of Marv here somewhere. I mean, I have him somewhere in the back. Hang on one second. I want to waste time. This is a little picture of Marv.

Barry Shore:

Right there. Oh, that is very Marv.

Peter Himmelman:

So, I drew the picture, I like to draw, and you’ll notice the water is rising around him, he’s very afraid all the time because he’s out looking for danger. The reason that the water is rising is I can’t draw hands very well so I just improvised the water. But when I felt in that little moment improvising that song, I felt that I wanted to give you a gift. And it may not be the best gift in the world but it’s the best gift that I could give you at the moment. Marv was generally thwarting us from doing things because he doesn’t want us to fail. He was like, go ahead, Peter, do this, you’re already in the process. Marv then becomes your champion. Once he realizes that you’re going for this, you’re not tentative, you’re not circling the idea. Then what happens to me, and I can say there’s a universal aspect to this because I’ve talked to many people in many fields, science, music, art, actuaries, sociologists, we all have this creative thing inside. It’s not just for “artist types.” So many times I’m not creative. Even though I got a guitar and a hat trying to look cool, a little goatee, which my wife’s friend always says seems like a little cry for help. 

Barry Shore:

It was always very smart. 

Peter Himmelman:

Many times I’m just repeating myself. In other words, don’t think that only the artists are the creative people, mail carriers, it can be brilliant, and in creative zones. When I’m in that zone, again, kind of pushed this Marv character, this internal judgment out of the way, the energy, which does so as I mentioned, is to make you happy or to do something. We’ll go back to joy and hope in a second. The words appear to me as though on a screen. I’ve been doing this thing forever since I’m a kid. But even right now what we’re doing is complete improvisation. We may be speaking about things that we’ve spoken about in the past, of course, we have our storehouse of riffs and things that we do. But generally, I’m kind of amped-up now much more than I was 15 minutes ago, and I thought I didn’t even know when we’re doing this next week. And this is an improv too, this is real. We’re writing a script, and we’re not thinking carefully about what we’re going to say. There’s always auditing, we’re going to keep it focus. But this idea of pushing away judgment to do something for somebody else to make them happy to elevate them. I had a very famous rabbi who once said to me, very famous old sage, and he said to me, I’ll try to do the accent. I was playing for a newly married couple. And one of the traditions is in the first week of their marriage they have these dinners, and the tradition is that you try to make them happy, glad in the bride and groom. So I brought my guitar and I didn’t think it was that important. And the rabbi said to me after he heard me riff, just like what I was doing, it wasn’t any rehearsed thing it was just a throwaway. He says, look, you should understand what you’re doing. Your purpose in life is to bring joy and happiness to people. And I think about that so often now. And you find what your positive purpose is, you become so much, first of all, so much more joyous, you become stronger, you become more confident. We will do for others so much more than we will do for ourselves.

Barry Shore:

Let me share with you. First of all, I’m so happy that you were riffing on this. This is great. And especially the accent. Yes, I could see him as you’re doing that. Joy is a wonderful three-letter word, the acronym for journey of you. Joy, because when you’re on your journey, by definition it is joyful. It can only be that. That’s why you were put here. The good Lord says I need Peter in the world and we’re going to bring him down and have him strum, and do, and be. And that’s what you do. That’s one of the reasons I love you and I was so glad. And then even when you said, gee I didn’t know we were going to do it today. I wasn’t upset. Just do it. Okay, we’ll do it. It will be, it will happen. That’s why it’s so great. By the way, this whole idea of you playing and seeing things as if it weren’t a screen. And I think is probably not just you. You spoke with other people who are, let’s say musicians, creative artists like that. I think that is a genius insight, not that you are genius, it’s the genius insight. In other words, every single person can let Marv become their friend, and bring it forth so that you can see the words in front of you. And just as delivering mail, skip down the street.

Peter Himmelman:

That’s really it. And the people that you meet and the people that touch. The idea of Marv, there are different metaphors for this. It’s called the amygdala, the limbic brain, there are people, social. Different scientists talk about it but what it really is, is the sense of internal judgment, and we have it going through. It’s a natural part of our being that it’s trying to protect us through our process of genetics and evolution, however, one defines that. And to be cognizant, to be aware of this is very helpful. Am I in an imminently dangerous situation, or is this maybe could cause me slight embarrassment? No, it’s not a real danger. So go do it. Say something to somebody, as you said, thank you at the store. There’s no limit to how often you can provade this kind of joy, this gratitude. It’s not like, well, if I sold a certain amount of records, or if the stock exchange, it’s always present, it’s not that saving the whales isn’t an important thing but sometimes people have these aspirations that are so lofty, they’re never really in touch with them. They’re not tangible. So, you’re going to go save the whales but you’re yelling at your kids and your wife. I mean, it doesn’t make any sense. 

Barry Shore:

Very good. By the way, that’s one of the reasons why in my book called “The Joy of Living,” how to slay stress and be happy, we speak about this very simple process of learning how to integrate into your being the ability to say thank you three times a day, consciously, conscientiously because it makes a difference for you. In other words, self-actualization comes first, and it spreads to the family, to your friends, and to all living beings because energy as you know more than most people because this is your world, energy has no boundary. There’s no Marv when it comes to energy. It can’t be stopped. So, you want to put forth the positive, purposeful, powerful, pleasant energy.

Peter Himmelman:

You touched on a really great point. Because in a physical world if I give you 75 cents out of my dollar, well, I only have 25, and that’s how we measure it. If I allow you space in my house, well, then I have less. And these are properties of the physical world. And we’ve imbibed these ideas. And they become so habituated in our thinking that we don’t understand that things like love and kindness and hope they aren’t limited. They are by nature unlimited. They don’t exist in the temporal world. And there’s the great analogy of the candle, which is itself an interesting thing, a flame. It’s not really a property of the physical world. I mean, it’s adjacent to exist in but not so much. It’s not a liquid, it’s not a solid, it’s not a gas, it’s something else and it’s a property as an analogy that you can see. You can light an infinite number of candles from one flame, you never stop. Sometimes I do these sessions, which you mentioned this thing, big muse. I’ll shut off the lights in a big room. I’ll make sure the fire marshal is okay with it [crosstalk: 29:35-29:38] in a couple of corners of the room will have an actual candle, everyone will have one and everyone passes is to the neighbor and the room is dark. Now, the room is illuminated only by these candles and you play music to candlelight it, [crosstalk: 29:55] good but the metaphor is very beautiful because in a very childlike, simplistic manner you reveal this idea. And love is akin to this candle, in the sense as I mentioned that it’s an unlimited property.

Barry Shore:

And as we say, love is just a four-letter word, which stands for living on vibrant energy and we have vibrant energy going out. So out the world right now we’re going to come back after a big break because people love our gig, and they like to advertise with us. We’ll be right back after these brief messages, don’t go away. More Peter Himmelman, and maybe even Marv on the other side of this break. Don’t go away.

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Barry Shore:

Good day beautiful, bountiful, beloved, immortal beings and good-looking people, and remember you’re good-looking because you’re always looking for and finding the good. Our cup runneth over with good. It’s a two-legged being, his name is Peter Himmelman, not even aka Marv because that’s a certain person. But he brought his friend with him just to talk to us about it. And we’re talking about love, we’re talking about wow, we’re talking about health, love, living on vibrant energy. That’s what you were talking about Peter. Wow, words of wisdom, words of wonder and health, helping everyone achieve life through happiness. That’s what you do. So let’s continue to rock on. And I’m going to ask you a couple of things unless, of course, you want to sing another song? If you do, we’ll let you do that. If not, I want to ask you about one of the most intriguing songs you’ve ever done, in my humble opinion. And I wrote down, the woman with the strength of 10,000 men. Not only is the title fabulous but the song is great. If you could just talk to us a little bit about it, only because it’s one of those “Avant-garde” types of things that really did rock the whole underground in the music scene.

Peter Himmelman:

Well, I’ll try to make it as brief as possible. I don’t know how Avant-garde it was. Let me just mention too, that the way sometimes songs are born they’re very much like a birth process. And there is, as they say, the seminal moment, there’s something that happens. And it didn’t necessarily result in a song, just something that was very touching. And then in a sense back to that birth metaphor. It grows within a person. And it has an incubation period, and then there’s a birth period, where it culminates in some way. When it’s time to be born you don’t know when it can happen, it can happen 10 minutes after the experience. It can happen, in my case, the song, maybe a year later. So, the experience that I had was that my uncle brought me, as he has always done, he’s been a real mentor of mine. And he’s always shown me very interesting things. When I was a kid, and failing out of junior high he brought me a John Lee Hooker double album. That’s what he did for me. And I’m grateful for him every day. This is about 89 or something. He said I want to take you somewhere you will find this interesting. We went to this woman’s house, it was in her living room, and there we were, and she’s on a hospital bed. And I was trying to make sense of the whole picture. He didn’t explain anything about her. Turned out that she had Lou Gehrig’s disease, ALS. And she could only communicate with….because no muscles in her body worked except for her eyebrow. She couldn’t speak, she had been a dancer too. I mean, to add a horrible ironic bit to it. Very beautiful woman, you can see [crosstalk: 37:34]. And she apparently was so fast with it they had to keep upgrading it. And I asked her what kind of fish are these? There was an aquarium, I was a bit of a junior ethologist as a kid, and she typed out beev when the are brackish water, fish. Okay. I’m like, interesting. And I’m just kind of drinking this whole thing in. There was a guy at this place with my uncle whom this woman didn’t really know apparently very well. He starts quoting some philosophy. And he says, what doesn’t kill you only makes you stronger. Which is the stupidest thing you would ever say. I don’t know what I wanted to do. But this woman, her name was Susan Margolis was so quick. She writes with her eyebrow, and I may have to explain and translate this for those that don’t speak Yiddish. She types oy vey. Oy vey, there’s no real great [crosstalk: 38:56]. It just means you’ve just seen something that’s so incredulous. So weird. So ineffable, so stupid in this case. And the attendant just waltzes this guy right out of her room. These are my memories. So I wrote this song. It just came out. The birth process just happened all at once, and the song appeared. I was on Epic Records at the time, a Sony label, and they loved this song, I was going to put it on my record, the record is happening, and the artwork’s there and I realized, oh my God, though it doesn’t mention her last name the chorus was Suzanne, I owe you an apology for all the days I let slide through my hands. Suzanne, I owe you an apology. You are the woman with the strength of 10,000 men. And I figured I need to tell her. By this time she wasn’t reachable. She wasn’t at her home. She was in a hospital in St. Paul. And I called the hospital. And I got an attendant, a nurse because Susan can talk. I said, here’s the story, and Susan was kind of typing, she said, well, I want Peter to come and play it for me. And she’s a no-nonsense person, this Susan because she said, oy vey, get this guy out of here basically. He’s annoying the hell out of me.

Barry Shore:

She does not suffer fools lightly.

Peter Himmelman:

Exactly. So I was quite nervous. The most nerve-wracking audition I’d ever had. And I came with the lyric sheet, I hadn’t even memorized the song and I put it on her bed and I sang it. And she isn’t clapping, it’s silent, and she starts typing. And she types B. E. A, and pauses and I knew that she was going to say, beat it. Get outta here. And she continued beautiful insight into what I’m feeling. And the song was released. It was popular for me. You can look it up. It’s called “The Woman of the Strength of 10,000 Men,” and they played it at a funeral. But I don’t want to bore anyone here but somewhat recently I got a letter from, I didn’t even know that Susan had a brother, this letter I may get too emotional, but I don’t really care. It’s part of joy. He wrote me a letter a couple of years ago about the song. He writes I am Alan, the brother of Susan, I’m using my wife’s Facebook account because I want to respond to your moving post about Susan. I wrote something online about her. I was so grateful to read your wonderful story. Everything you related about your meetings with her including her insistence that you fly to Minneapolis to personally perform your song was classic Suzy. ALS took away virtually all her physical abilities but it sharpened her only remaining instrument or intellect. As the disease progressed, Suzy became more and more focused on her individual rights, and the rights and independence of others. She actually spoke with Congress to change some laws. She never cared about accolades but your visits with her were very personal and meaningful. We still listen to the cassette tape of “Woman with a Strength of 10,000 Men,” that you gave her. Dignity and the ability to be understood are precious commodities to people with severe disabilities. Suzy paid you her highest compliment when she credited you with insight into how she felt. My family thanks you for singing about the Suzy we knew rather than the disability she battled for so long. I mean, that’s better than 1000 platinum records. 

Barry Shore:

Exactly, Peter. There are hundreds of thousands of people around the world from as many backgrounds as you can imagine. From communist China, India, throughout Africa, Europe, Asia, America, who understand that what we’ve just done is to touch the very essence of the human. And that’s why I am so deeply touched, humbled, and honored that you’re here today. And I didn’t know this and I didn’t expect it. Although in some way I did because it’s you.

Peter Himmelman:

It’s deep. I didn’t really realize what your tone was. I’m pretty quick on the draw when I see somebody and you can draw conclusions in a few seconds. The show is super joyous and you’re funny and joyous but it’s also exceedingly serious because it’s real. This isn’t a fluffy subject and something for a Hallmark card. You’re speaking real truth here. And it cuts through all sorts of pedantic, political, it’s essential. It’s drained of its artifice. The way that you are pervane it’s very, very refreshing.

Barry Shore:

Thank you. Let’s shift a little bit. Let’s talk about the Spinoza bear.

Peter Himmelman:

Wow [crosstalk: 45:54].

Barry Shore:

I love Spinoza bear for several reasons. Number one, you have to have a good grounding in philosophical take life Spinoza. And bear because what’s more cuddly than a little bear? It has become the symbol of how safety, especially for children.

Peter Himmelman:

The irony is, is that you’ve taken a fearful thing, the power of the bear as a metaphor as you took a fearful thing and made it safe. He made it friendly and soft.

Barry Shore:

So what did Spinoza bear do? What did you do with Spinoza?

Peter Himmelman:

This is part of my history. One of the things I’m so grateful for and have nothing to do with anything I’ve done. It’s just the things that God has set before me, and hear these experiences and these people. So, when I was a kid, I was about 18 years old, and I was a musician and playing professionally and so on. But I wasn’t really making much money. A woman approached me and her name was Ruth Grosh. And Ruth was a new age person before anyone quite knew what that was. Apparently, somebody told me now she’s changed her name to a Native American name and was living in some tribal compound in Western Canada. So, she went all the way [crosstalk: 47:32] eagles are soaring above her. But she had heard of me from a musician friend of mine named Steven Greenberg, who was famous for writing the song funky town, and he was in Minneapolis, he’s a few years older than me. And he was a mentor to me. So, she was looking for somebody to write music for this teddy bear that would be used for kids, initially, maybe for therapeutic purposes. And she was paying me actual money, too. This was unheard of for writing songs. Songs just come out of me they don’t cost me anything. They don’t cause blood. I mean, they’re fun. And I started writing the songs, and one of them was the theme song was, I’m your friend, and my name is Spinoza and whenever you hear me I feel happy inside. If you like I can lie on my shoulder tada, tada, tada. I have all the songs, there’s a dozen of them. And it went over really well. And then I also voiced the bear. She said, well, could you do a voice of a bear?

Barry Shore:

And you said, of course, that’s what I do.

Peter Himmelman:

That’s right. They asked, can you do this? Of course, I can. So this was the voice of Spinoza. Hi, I’m Spinoza bear. It had a little bit of a southern accent, too. And they started making a bunch of these different videos. They weren’t videos they were tapes. It was a cassette tape that when in a zipper in a pouch, and there was an old tape cassette player in there and it was a nice furry bear. The fur was of high quality. And there were different topics. Some of them started to get progressively more serious. There was one that I wrote, I should send you these songs too I have them somewhere, it took me years to track them down. One was for kids who were terminally ill and I remember I was 19 or 18 years old writing these songs. And they were serious, they were truthful, that one was like you’re going to a place. 

Barry Shore:

You weren’t sugarcoating it. 

Peter Himmelman:

No, but it was still for young people and children. But the result was that this bear became very popular in rape crisis centers, in counseling centers, especially with kids that were kind of on a spectrum. 

Barry Shore:

One of the spectrums I particularly found fascinating is because I have twin nieces who are both autistic.

Peter Himmelman:

So, this was specifically where the chief advantages were. Now, this was way before the internet so communication between people and myself was much slower. And it’s kind of funny at the time, I didn’t think as much of it as I do now. When you’re in a process it’s just something that you do and something that’s happened. Even the Susan Margolis story I look back on it now with a more powerful lens. But what I got was this letter from a mother who said, our five-year-old autistic child, who has never responded to anything in the world, completely cut off, it was hard for me to understand what that meant. I’d never seen anyone that was autistic. I didn’t know what that was. Got up, walked to the bear, and hugged the bear. And this was the greatest revelation. [Crosstalk: 52:10] to this woman, I don’t have the letter anymore. But when you talk about this idea of say, spreading joy and hope because I do the same in a lot of my sessions. I ask what do you think. These are people from Boeing, Three M, Honeywell, people say, people In Honeywell these type-A males. [Crosstalk: 52:35] problem with this. I’ve worked with the United States Army with generals and ship admirals. Everyone is a human being at some level, I have no fear talking about it. What is your motivating principle? Why do you think you were born, which is somewhat of a theological question. I remember one kid, he was at the University of Pennsylvania, a sharp kid, he’s like, and I don’t think there is any such purpose. And he was kind of guarded, which I’m not going to fight with him. And he was a sweet kid. And I know that when somebody says that because I’m that person, too. I have a very, or used to, as a younger person has a very harder, much harder shell. And I understood very well that this young man was a grad student who was protecting some very sensitive area of vulnerability. And it came out that he was trying always to please his parents. And his thing was to give his gifts to children that they would be free to create. It finally came out.

Barry Shore:

That’s the genius of Mr. Himmelman, I think. And that’s what you’re doing. It’s hard to believe but our time is not gone, it’s been deep and wonderful. 

Peter Himmelman:

It’s not gone it’s up. 

Barry Shore:

It’s up. Up stands for unlimited potential.

Peter Himmelman:

That’s it. I knew you would have one.

Barry Shore:

I have three quick questions for you wonderful, Peter. Are you ready?

Peter Himmelman:

Yeah. 

Barry Shore:

Number one, will you come back again?

Peter Himmelman:

I was going to ask, would you have me with all the blabbing away I was doing.

Barry Shore:

Good. We want more blab, baby. Okay, that’s number one. So come back again. Number two, you have 80 seconds to answer this. What is your most fervent desire?

Peter Himmelman:

My fervent desire is pretty easy. This Marv of character that I’ve tried to explain the sense of judgment. I like to do a radical not elimination because as I said, he’s a lifesaver if something should come up but have him only be there in a truly life-threatening situation so that I would become much more of who I am that joy that you mentioned, journey of you. And that didn’t take 80 seconds, that’s my fervent desire.

Barry Shore:

Then it shall be fulfilled, wish granted.

Peter Himmelman:

Also to do it in health.

Barry Shore:

Yes, key as we get day-by-day. And number three is, may I give you a hug in front of 362,890 people around the world?

Peter Himmelman:

My hygiene may not be that great today but nobody knows.

Barry Shore:

Let me tell you what hug stands for, heartfelt, unlimited giving. Here we go 1-2-3 roar. And of course, you have been listening to The Joy of Living with your humble host Barry Shore and our amazing guest wonderful Peter Himmelman. Know that this show is wonderful as Peter is it’s not about him. And as wonderful Barry Shore is it’s not about me. This show is all about you, YOU, you becoming the best you possible because when you’re the best you make more harmony in the world, you build more bridges and create more joy, happiness, peace, and love because you live with the three fundamentals. Number one life, your life has purpose, and when you lead a purpose-driven life number two happens. It’s a good number two, you go mad. Mad is an acronym that stands to make a difference. And number three is to unlock the power and the secrets of everyday words and terms like www what a wonderful world. Smile, seeing miracles in life every day or as my eight-year-old niece says, seeing miracles in everyday life. Create the kind of world you want to live in causing, rethinking, enabling all to excel. That’s what Peter does, rethinking things. And of course, use four-letter words because we live in the world of positive, purpose, powerful and pleasant our four-letter words are sing, song, grow, hope, free, bear, swim, play, pray. And of course, tell the world to FU, capital N capital N. And remember, use the two most powerful words in the English language three times a day, every single day from now and the rest of your life. You’ll be happier, your family, your friends, and the whole world. Nothing can stop the energy as Peter has shared with us, and you’ll be happier, healthier, and wealthier. Who doesn’t want that? Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. And Peter and I offer a blessing to everybody which is to go forth, live exuberantly, spread the seeds of joy, happiness, peace, and love. Go mad, go make a difference. Peter, don’t go away, okay.

About Peter Himmelman

Peter Himmelman
Peter Himmelman is an American singer-songwriter and film and television composer from Minnesota, who formerly played in the Minneapolis indie rock band Sussman Lawrence before pursuing an extensive solo career.