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Remarkable Studio with Jodine Theron

The Ambassador of JOY, Barry Shore, is humbled and honored to introduce You to a most ONE-derful Person, Jodine Theron. Jodine is an Australian who returned to her African roots upon marrying her Namibian husband. They decided to move to a mud hut village in a remote part of Namibia. During the past three years, Jodine has studied Namibian cultures and researched social conditions that hinder local communities from escaping poverty. You’ll be amazed as Barry and she discuss how to help lift forgotten societies out of medieval times and into the 21st century. This is a Must SHARE with people You Love.

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Show Notes:

  • 00:45 – Barry’s rousing introduction
  • 14:17 – Jodine Theron on Remarkable Studio
  • 24:40 – What is a mud-hut village?
  • 41:55 – Reading about Dr. Albert Schweitzer
  • 52:21- Barry’s Interesting Wrap-up

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Barry Shore:

I can’t think of anybody that inspires noble deeds I want to share you with than the amazing, wonderful Jodine Theron. Jodine, please say hello to 357,220 people around the world.

Jodine Theron:

Hello. We are full of joy.

Barry Shore:

Jodine is the essence of joy personified. Now, you’ll notice three things about wonderful Jodine if you’re watching, if you’re only listening I’ll describe it to you. Number one, she is ebullient, look it up if you don’t know the word. Number two, she is blond-haired blue-eyed, and smiling face. Number three, she’s sitting in front of an oval picture of an elephant. All I see are big ears sticking out from the top of her head. Well, now there’s her trunk as well. And it’s actually beautiful. Because Jodine is coming to us from the country of Namibia, N-A-M-I-B-I-A of the southwestern coast of the great continent of Africa. And we’re going to talk about all kinds of interesting things because somebody who comes from Africa but grew up in Australia, and then comes back to Africa, a place called Namibia and lives in what we’ll call a mud-hut village, and whose whole being is oriented towards alleviating poverty, and keeping faith and making a social impact certainly deserves our attention. So, what we’re going to do right away is say, again, welcome to you wonderful, Jodine. And by the way, I urge everybody, everything you want to know about Jodine, all you have to do is go to the website barryshore.com. Everything about Jodine will be linked there because you do want to know. She’s a madwoman, she’s making a difference. So Jodine, let’s just jump right in and talk about what your whole reason for being is with you and your wonderful husband, Herman, and about alleviating poverty for many people that are mired in it, and what you’re doing to help break the cycle? Let’s discuss that right away. Would you please?

Jodine Theron:

Of course. Thank you so much for having this discussion with me. It is so important that we bring this story to the world because these societies and these people have been forgotten. They are just left to live the way that they have been living for thousands of years and I think a lot of people just assume that they’re happy to stay that way. But in fact, they’re actually not. And so, I’ve been living here for three years in this African village, in a mud-hut. I’m filming for my mud-hut right now. And I’ve just been building relationships, getting to know the people, and trying to understand why are they still living in mud huts without electricity, without sanitation, without any job opportunities, or any sort of infrastructure, they’re just not going forward. They still living day-to-day, and they’re just working in the cornfields. So, when you start talking to these people they have an awareness that the rest of the world has moved forward. They understand people have cars, electricity, they have computers, have nice houses, and they want those things as well. But they haven’t been given the opportunities to move forward. And where the big gap is, and where I’m trying to fill that and help them is with better education, specifically in technology on the Internet and computers, and then being able to connect them globally with organizations that are willing to hire them for work. Because this is the only way we’re going to help them to come out of poverty. It is a global effort that we have to get together and say no, it’s not okay that these people are being left behind by society. So that’s really what I’m here to do.

Barry Shore:

First of all, I’m honored that you’re with us today. It’s absolutely important to be able to bring to people wherever they live, now in this case, it’s Namibia, which I would say maybe 1/10 of 1% of the people watching and listening even know where it is but go scramble and do your search and see where it is on the map. And then I’d like you to do is understand that where Jodine and her husband live is in the far northeastern corner of Namibia. It’s in a game preserve area. So it’s quite pristine and such. But pristine is nice for people living in the Western world. But pristine for people who have, we’ll call it, subsistence living. Literally what we call eking out a living from the earth by planting corn and somehow living on the corn, not just having a bountiful harvest and selling it into the marketplace but literally using it to maintain life and limb and therefore not gaining the benefits of what we call the 21st century. So, let’s unpack a few things if we can, Jodine. One is, how did you even begin to decide that Namibia was the place you wanted to be? Obviously, you married a Namibian man but where did you meet your husband and that this is what you and he want to dedicate your lives to, which is not so much helping people come out of poverty but to break the cycle of poverty so that second generation, the third generation after you are no longer mired in that terrible mindset, which by the way, it is, as you said, education is the key. So, tell us a little bit about your journey to get to the point where a woman living in Australia comes to Namibia?

Jodine Theron:

So, I was happily living in city lifestyle in Perth, Western Australia, and I love Perth, I still look at it as my home, my family is there. And I met my husband online. And so, I flew over to Namibia to meet him. And then shortly after that, we got married. And so of course, I said, no, I want to come to Namibia. And somehow within my spirit, I just feel like, I always knew that I was going to go to Namibia, even as a small child. I remember my mother telling me about Namibia where she came from. And I just always had this really deep desire to go to Namibia. And so, when I finally came here I just felt like I’m supposed to be here, there’s something that I’m supposed to do here. And my husband, he’s got a job working with local communities here, his company helps them to harvest the local plant that grows here. So that actually gives them some income, yearly income, and it’s very small. And so, he was already used to going to very rural areas and being in touch with these village people. And so, the first year I met him I went traveling around with him for work. And we would sleep in tents, we would sleep in the wild, and we would go to these villages. And I just love meeting all these people. And I just said to him, I think that we should live in one of these villages because I really want to get to know the people. And for me, I thought if I really want to try and understand where they come from, what they’re struggling with, and how I can help them, I want to be close to them, I want to be part of their community, and I want to build those trust relationships with them. And so, we got permission from one of the village leaders that we’re able to stay in the community. They have a very traditional way of doing things here. So, they gave us permission and so we’ve been here since then. And I’ve just been building relationships, listening to the kids from school, all the things that they struggle with. The schools are actually really poor here. They might have one textbook for the whole class. And if they have to study for an exam, whoever has the textbook he’s the one that’s probably going to do better in the exam. And the rest of the kids just have to do exams from memory. So, it’s really starting from that young age that they struggle so much. There can be one teacher and 100 students. So education obviously is a huge gap. Next to that is that the children don’t really have any future to look forward to because, for them, the only thing that they know that’s going to happen in their future is working in the cornfield. So that’s what their whole lives revolve around. And so, I really just wanted to open up that gap. And me being here in a mud-hut myself, a part of the community is proof that it is possible to A, get on the internet and B, have a business or have a job. So, this is the concept that gave me this idea, well, if I’m able to be here, even though I’m in a rural village where there’s no electricity, there’s no infrastructure, I’m able to get access to the internet. Right now we are doing a live stream so there’s no problem with connectivity. And so that was for me the solution that brought it all together.

Barry Shore:

Let’s begin to unpack some of this monumental wonderful, magnificent work that you and your husband are doing and to bring to bear for people who have no conception whatsoever what a mud-hut village is. Let’s go to some basics. In the village where you live, approximately how many people?

Jodine Theron:

I would say in this area where I am, there would be maybe about 200 people. Now, there is village upon village upon village. So, there’s a whole strip of just villages, it’s practically almost touching each other. 

Barry Shore:

Let’s take a number, 200 people per village but within a radius of let’s say 10 kilometers, there might be 30 villages. Is that fair?

Jodine Theron:

Exactly. Yeah. And actually, if you were to look at the location where we are based, it’s a very thin strip in the northern parts of Namibia. Basically, that whole strip, that whole area in Namibia is all just villages along that whole strip.

Barry Shore:

By the way, is it a fertile strip in the sense that people are planting corn? Are there any other crops like potato, wheat, or anything else that people grow that is able to be in that area? In others, is it a fertile place or is it very dry and unforgiving?

Jodine Theron:

So, it’s both those things. In the winter it’s very, very, very dry. But in summer it’s got lots of rain. And it’s quite semi-tropical, in a sense. So it’s actually both of those. So, for six months of the year, people do not grow anything because it is so dry and so harsh and so hot. But in the summer months when it is raining, that’s when they plant all their corn, they also grow millet. They also grow wild beans, wild watermelon. There are lots of papaya and fruit mangoes. Guava, I don’t know if you know that fruit. So, that’s the sort of thing that they eat here. But the majority of their staple food is corn.

Barry Shore:

By the way, on some levels, it’s very interesting that there are not a lot of processed foods available in the villages. Which by the way, is sometimes the bane of existence for Westerners. In other words, processed food is not that good for you. Wholesome foods are much better. I’m presuming and please correct me if I’m wrong, you’re now working with us over the internet in a mud-hut or near a mud hut and it’s not a hardwire connection, it’s through a satellite that you’re getting internet, is that correct?

Jodine Theron:

So, the way the internet works here is I have a modem that is wireless. And it connects through the mobile phone tower. And that’s how I’m getting internet. It’s almost like if you were to just get internet through your phone but you actually have a modem. And that’s how I’m connecting to it.

Barry Shore:

Are mobile phones readily available in villages where you live?

Jodine Theron:

Yes, actually, there are a lot of people that do have phones but they don’t tend to have smartphones, they just tend to have very simple Nokia-type phones.

Barry Shore:

Fine but at least they’re able to communicate with a phone. So, they’re touching the 21st century but really the key is, as you said, education, the ability to bring in information on a regular basis through laptops. So do people have access to laptops, or is it very rare? In other words, Jodine and Herman have a laptop, and you’re the only one in the village with a laptop, or are they somewhat available?

Jodine Theron:

They’re not available at all. So, the majority of people have never seen a computer before. I would say only the ones that have ever gone to a University or have studied some diploma or certificate might have been in contact with a computer. But the majority of people here have never seen a computer before. So, that’s part of what I’m trying to do with my current project is that I’m trying to find sponsorship. And so, you can sponsor a villager to get computer training. And I will be purchasing a lot of computers and putting up a building and then training the people.

Barry Shore:

This is so exciting. So, let’s now go to a very simple question. Is English the lingua franca of the village, obviously the native languages are for each village but are people also capable of speaking English regularly?

Jodine Theron:

Absolutely. English is actually the national language of Namibia. And it is taught in all the schools. But the problem is just that grammatically they’re not taught very good English because the teachers don’t really care to teach at a very high level.

Barry Shore:

Again, the genius of this is that thankfully English is available and when you bring in your computers, of which God-willing this show and others will be able to bring you enough for everybody in all the whole strip, wherever you want, they’ll be able to at least begin to utilize the keyboard and understand some of what they’re doing so that, like in any situation out of every 100 people, you’ll have five that excel, five that are very hard to teach, 30 in the middle that will be able to get better than they were and bring everybody else along. So, I hope that part of what you’re saying here is that the ability to have computers will obviate the necessity for physical books at the moment, even though books are very important. In my humble opinion, I think books are more important than computers sometimes because to hold something tangible and walk with it, go on to the fields and just sit wherever you want it’s a truly remarkable situation. But computers will be able to bring to remote villages in northern Namibia the genius of the 21st century and break the cycle of poverty. Is that correct?

Jodine Theron:

Yes, absolutely, 100%. And it’s been proven that this is the key to coming out of poverty. If you’re looking at countries like India, the Philippines, even South America where people have got access to the internet, they can buy computers. They’re able to get themselves out of poverty, they’re able to provide for their communities, and for their families. And so this is something unfortunately that has been left a little bit behind in Africa. And I think it is because there’s so much fraud and things happening here that they haven’t really pushed so much. I mean, it is extremely difficult. I come from Australia, where I had an online business. And it is extremely difficult to start an online business in Africa. You can have no access to merchant accounts, you cannot have PayPal, none of that. It’s very, very difficult. And so, because I have access to those things from Australia I’m able to help the people here. But by themselves, even if they wanted to be an entrepreneur online it is really difficult.

Barry Shore:

You don’t need me to say this, but ready? Yay, Jodine. I am remembering something from my boyhood, reading about Dr. Albert Schweitzer, a great doctor from Europe, who decided to go into the deepest part of Africa, the Congo area, and dedicate himself to bringing medicine and healing to not just villages but for miles around people would come. And it made a difference in the lives of generations. And after our break, I’m going to come back and talk to you about the power of one person and what it means, what you’re doing, and the ability to know what exists and what can be, and to literally look at, let’s say, a five-year-old boy and a girl right now that you know, neighbors in your mud-hut village, and know that when they’re 15 and 20 that they will have different access to the world than their parents. And then the next generation after that. By the way, do you speak the local language at all or is it that you communicate with everybody in English?

Jodine Theron:

I communicate in English but I am learning a bit of Chifwe.

Barry Shore:

And by the way, with that funny accent, that’s another story. That means if I come to visit Namibia, in your village, I’ll hear people speaking with an Australian accent. 

Jodine Theron:

Maybe.

Barry Shore:

Very nice. Let’s just ask one quick question as a cliffhanger, and then we’re going to do a brief break from our sponsors. And that is now that we’re talking about breaking the cycle of poverty, and God-willing you’ll have enough computers that you want, have you considered teaching the kids how to do coding?

Jodine Theron:

Absolutely. For me, there is just no limit to what I want to teach them.

Barry Shore:

On that note keep your seatbelts buckled, everybody. There’s more Jodine coming back and she’s going to tell us how she is raising up the next superstars for the internet through coding in Namibia and beyond. We’ll be right back after this brief message. 

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Barry Shore:

Good day beautiful, bountiful, beloved immortal beings and good-looking people. Remember you’re good looking, always looking for and finding the good, we have good in abundance, our cup runneth over with good. And a two-legged person named Jodine Theron, she comes from Australia, actually comes from South Africa, through Namibia, to Australia, back to Namibia in the northeastern part of the country, mud-hut village. But she’s speaking to us through the genius of the internet, through a satellite, through a modem, through the mobile’s process. And her whole being, she and her husband are to break the cycle of poverty and make a true social impact and literally bring to the world the future Steve Jobs’ and coders of the internet to literally lift people up and out of poverty and into the wealth that exists for everybody. We’re not talking just monetary wealth, we’re talking about the wealth of family life, and doing good and being of benefit in the world, along with living better than they are now scratching on a subsistence level. So, I want to talk about your mother. Because I think your mother had a very strong, positive, purposeful, powerful, pleasant influence on you. I think her name is Monica because I asked you for some quotes that really help your life. And one of them comes from your mother. I believe she wrote, without the bad, you’ll never know how good, good is. And let’s be blunt. For you to have left Australia and to marry a man in Namibia I think that takes guts on your part but also somebody who trusts you and believes you and I think that was your mother. Is that true?

Jodine Theron:

I would say that my mother has always instilled in me that whatever is going on, whatever decisions you make just do what is right, do what is good. And so for me, it’s never a question of what am I giving up? Where am I going? Is it the right thing for me to do? And am I capable of doing it?

Barry Shore:

Well, I’m going to make you laugh out loud. Are you ready? Because you make me think about dog poop. I told you you’re going to laugh out loud. You make me see the dog poop. By the way, we have over 365,000 people listening to us right now, Jodine because they’re fascinated. So what are you talking about, Barry Shore, dog poop? Because on this show we deal with the three fundamentals. Remember, life has purpose, go mad, go make a difference and unlock the power and the sequence of everyday words and terms by using acronyms. Dog poop stands for doing of good, power of one person.

Jodine Theron:

I’ve never thought of dog poop being so good.

Barry Shore:

When you have dogs and the village has dogs, whenever you walk by dogs or dog poop, for now, you’re going to say, wow, this is wonderful. You’re going to tell all the kids, and they’re going to say what are you talking about? Well, let me tell you what an acronym means. First letter and…. so they can go and tell all their friends and tell their friends doing of good because that’s why we’re here, power one person. People sometimes think, Jodine, what can I do? And say I’m just one person and the genius of life is with faith and believing in the good Lord who created everything one person makes a difference. That’s the power of one person. That’s poop. So dog poop, that’s you.

Jodine Theron:

And you know, Barry, I do sometimes just need to hear that from people that believe in the impossible. Because there are a lot of people that have so far told me and said to me, what are you doing, Jodine? You’re just one person. How are you going to get people out of poverty? There are so many people in poverty in Africa, what are you going to do? They tell me to go get a job or do something else. And I just refuse, I refuse, I refuse.

Barry Shore:

Jodine, this is what’s called the power of faith. And let me give you an acronym for faith. Because this is what you live, you and your husband. And by the way, not just you and your husband, everybody you touch. The genius of the power of one person and the power of faith is that it has no barrier, not a mud wall, not a brick wall, not a steel wall. That can never be an end to the genius of goodness in the world. It just goes on and on and never stops. Faith is a wonderful acronym. It stands for finding answers in the hidden. It may be hidden from all the people who said to you, what are you doing? If I can do it they’re going to….it’s hidden to them. Did you know with faith, it’s just nothing is impossible, that you are making things possible. And that’s the genius in what you’re doing. See, it’s the day-to-day-to-day process. Look, every human being goes through stuff. I don’t care if you live in Perth if you live in New York City if you live in Los Angeles, or you live in a mud-hut in Namibia, there are the pressures of life, everyday situations, which call upon us all to dig deep. And to know as long as we’re serving and serving the Creator that it’s all correct. And therefore, it’s not just nothing’s impossible, you make a difference. This is what social impact is. You are impacting. By the way, I’d like to give you if I may, during the break, I wrote out an acronym for mud-hut. Do you want to hear it? 

Jodine Theron:

Yeah. 

Barry Shore:

Mud-hut. Mud stands for making understanding demonstrable. And hut stands for helping unlimited transformation.

Jodine Theron:

Wonderful. I love it. And it is unlimited. Because I believe that what I’m doing here is not just going to help the people in Namibia, it can help all the villages across the whole globe.

Barry Shore:

And by the way, when you speak it, it becomes real. There are three things in life that we all understand intellectually. But once it gets deep inside of you, now you can literally what they call, move mountains. When your thoughts, your words, and your deeds are all aligned in goodness then there is absolutely no barrier. And what you do doesn’t just touch the people that you’re talking to at the moment, again, through this medium, over the podcast, in the village, sitting with 1, 2, 5, 100, 200 people, it doesn’t matter. It’s the ability to instill faith and hope. Hope stands for, this is you, helping others progress every day. So, I want to hear some of the small wins that you’ve had. Can you give some examples of let’s say, a 10-year-old or a 20-year-old or anybody who’s been impacted by what it is that you’re bringing to them with the idea of the internet, or just the idea that you’re there to make a difference?

Jodine Theron:

Well, it’s not just the internet, there are so many things that you can impact these people with. For example, the worker that comes in and helps us with the yard and work that we need to do around here when I asked him, have you ever seen the ocean? And he said yeah, I know what the ocean is. I said, what is it? And he described to me the big Zambezi River that’s close by. I said, no, that’s not the ocean. The ocean is water that you cannot even imagine how much it is. It is as far as the eye can see. And to me, it’s so incredible and amazing that these people have not even experienced the planet that we live on. And so, with the thought of having computers and being able to show them God’s creation, showing them the ocean, fish underneath the sea, all of these things are going to be so exciting, it’s going to be so amazing for me to show that and share that with them and the other simple things. Then there could be very heart-wrenching ways that I help people. There’s a young boy here, his name is Bernard, there’s a video of him on my Facebook, and if people can go watch the interview I did with him. He’s the sweetest boy. But sometimes he has to go look after cattle instead of going to school. And he would come by my house because it’s on the way to where he takes the cattle to drink. I think he’s eight, nine years old. And he would walk all day, get up early in the morning without eating, and walk all day out in the sun. And sometimes it gets 40, 45 degrees Celsius here. He would have no food, he’d have no water. He’d come by my house and I would give him something to eat, I would give him some water and we would just talk a little while and then he’ll be back out all day until sunset doing that. And to me, that’s so heart-wrenching because he’s only a young boy and he is very eager to learn. So on days that he’s off, he’ll come to visit me and then we will work on his English. I will teach him how to write properly, do the ABCs, and stuff like that. So, that to me is very small ways but it is so fulfilling. It makes me so happy to be able to just give back in these small ways and build relationships with these kids because that way I really understand how I can help them and the challenges and everything that they still face. And this will be a transition period for me going from taking them out of village lifestyle, like looking after cattle, having responsibilities to help their parents in the cornfields, and then transitioning with I don’t have to do those things anymore and they can just be children.

Barry Shore:

Let me ask because I’m sure it’s a question for everybody listening also, tell us about having potable water. Is it readily available, difficult?

Jodine Theron:

So, there is quite a lot of work the government has done in putting boreholes so we have access to drinking water in most walking distance in all the villages. So, the way that we get water to drink is we will go and get water from the borehole and we will fill up canisters, and then we’ll keep them here at home. So, every few days we have to go and fetch water. For water that we use to shower, wash dishes, wash clothes, my husband goes with the car to the river and then he’ll pump water into a small tank, and then he’ll pump that into a bigger tank at home. And so, we’re able to wash that way. Obviously, the local people are not able to do that. And they will just collect a small bucket of water and do very basic things with that.

Barry Shore:

Can people drink out of the, it’s the Zambezi, you said?

Jodine Theron:

No. The water is really not clean enough, you will get sick because it has a lot of parasites and things like that in it. It doesn’t flow quite enough where we are to be able to be clean enough to drink. So, we’re only really able to drink the water that comes from under the ground.

Barry Shore:

Even the water from under the ground, because when I traveled around in very backward places, backward not meaning they’re bad, just backward places, we would not drink water even from a well unless we boiled it first. Do they have to boil the water or not?

Jodine Theron:

No. We drink the water that comes from underneath the ground. So it’s actually quite plain, it’s nice, it’s natural. So we have no problems with that.

Barry Shore:

How does it taste? Does it taste sweet?

Jodine Theron:

It tastes wonderful. It tastes like how God meant for you to have water.

Barry Shore:

That’s what I’m asking you. Usually, water that comes directly from the Earth has a sweetness to it.

Jodine Theron:

Yes, absolutely. It’s wonderful. I love it.

Barry Shore:

Oh, wonderful. So let’s talk more. We’ve spoken about people and such. Just give us a sense of the local color because I mentioned to people you do live in a game preserve area. What kind of game and is there anything about the game that in any way causes difficulty for villagers or people? In other words, we’re still talking about what we call wild animals.

Jodine Theron:

So we definitely live in the wild here. And I’ve had my experiences being in a mud-hut. We don’t have proper roofing or anything like that. There’s just like a zinc roof that’s held down with bricks. And so it’s not really closed off from nature. And I’ve had incidences where there have been scorpions that come in and have fallen in my bed in the middle of the night and stung me on my arm, which I wouldn’t recommend to anybody. There have been snakes inside of our mud-hut. And we have a proper door. Now for the villages, they don’t have proper doors, they have even less protection. So, these things are on the floor, if they have a bit of clothes, or whatever. And there can be snakes in there, there can be snakes that come in while they’re sleeping, they have the children. And so, these are the sort of things that you find around the house and inside your house. In the area where we live, the villages, they often struggle during the time when they’re doing their harvesting with the corn because the elephants also love corn. And so, they have a bit of a battle with each other. So often during the harvest season, you will hear a lot of drum playing and beating. And that’s their way to keep the elephants away by making a lot of noise. It doesn’t always work. The elephants are quite big and when they want to eat nothing’s going to stand in their way. Also, literally near our house, we saw a hippopotamus tracks. So, just about a five-minute drive from where we are now, there’s a river and the hippo lives there. He’s the local hippo that lives around here. And I had no idea that they walk so far away from where they are to go and search for food at night and things like that. And apparently, the villagers tell me that they also like corn. So I didn’t know that. Other than that there’s obviously Jaguars, there’s a lot of deers and that sort of game wildlife, there are giraffes. 

Barry Shore:

In other words, just your regular downtown Namibian [inaudible: 49:34]. I live now in a place called Henderson Nevada, and we’re in the middle of a desert so there are scorpions here but they tend to be very small, maybe about half a thumb length. But I’m picturing the kind of scorpions that you’re talking about is probably larger. I don’t know. Are most of the snakes non-poisonous or there’s a great mixture of both poisonous and non-poisonous?

Jodine Theron:

I would say in my experience so far just here around the house where we live I’ve mostly seen very poisonous snakes. 

Barry Shore:

They’re poisonous?

Jodine Theron:

Yes. Actually, they’re very deadly.

Barry Shore:

What do you do when you see one? Do you have a snake catcher? I know it’s usually a long stick with something at the end.

Jodine Theron:

My husband has a shovel. So, he would usually go out if it’s a very poisonous snake and kill it with a shovel.

Barry Shore:

Oh, dear, just another day. By the way, no offense to anybody but unfortunately in a number of cities in the United States, certainly these days and throughout the world, what Jodine just described is not unusual. But it’s done by two-legged beings, not this other kind. It’s a problem. The reality of life and the struggle for life it’s serious. It’s true and serious. We don’t want to leave on this note we want to leave on a very high note. And I want to urge everybody again, to go to barryshore.com. Everything about Jodine, and what she and her husband are doing is there. And we urge everybody to not just consider it but to actively participate in helping out, bring the benefits of the world to people who want to live better. That’s really the key to breaking out of the cycle of poverty, in my humble opinion, is that there’s a desire and a need, the need we know, and the desire is also there. And again, dog poop helps. But you need the help of a lot of poops. People around the world [crosstalk: 51:57] reaching out. I’m going to ask you three quick questions wonderful, Jodine. The first one is, will you come back again?

Jodine Theron:

Absolutely. Anytime I can spend time with you. It’s a joy for me. Absolutely.

Barry Shore:

Thank you so much. And the next question is, you have only 80 seconds for this. So gather your thoughts. What is your most fervent desire? 80 seconds.

Jodine Theron:

My most fervent desire is that everybody can pick up the passion that I have to help these forgotten societies out of poverty. And I need people to come alongside me, live and breathe this dream with me.

Barry Shore:

That is a wonderful desire. And the third question is, may I give you a hug in front of 363,000 people around the world? 

Jodine Theron:

Yes, absolutely. I love hugs. 

Barry Shore:

Okay, so let me tell you what hugs stands for, are you ready? Heartfelt, unlimited giving. So on the count of three wonderful Jodine, 1-2-3 roar. Of course, you tuned into consciously and conscientiously The Joy of Living with your humble host, Barry Shore. And the joy of living can be summed up in one word, giving. And you’ve heard from one of the great givers of the world, wonderful Jodine Theron. She’s living with her husband in a Namibian village in North-Eastern Namibia. Forgotten people she says, but we can bring them out of the forgottenness in a breakthrough the poverty through faith and social impact. And remember you tuned in for one reason only not because of Jodine as wonderful as she is or Barry Shore because he’s so great. Not because of them because of you. Because you care the most in the whole world about you, Y-O-U. When you’re the best you, you make the world a better place, you build more harmony, you create more joy, happiness, peace, and love in the world. And remember, when that happens use the three fundamentals of life, you’ll be happier, healthier, and wealthy, who doesn’t want that? The first is live life with purpose. When you live a purpose-driven life you go mad, you make a difference. Like Jodine, she’s a man woman. And the third is, to unlock the power and the sequence of everyday words and terms like www what a wonderful world smile seeing miracles in life every day. Or as my eight-year-old niece says, seeing miracles in everyday life. Create the kind of world you want to live in causing, rethinking, enabling all to excel just like, Jodine. She thought about it, she says, I’m here to make a difference and she does. She created a whole world. And use the six most important words in the English language to internalize, utilize and leverage in your life. Choice, not chance determines your destiny as Jodine has done. Choice, not chance determines your destiny. Use four-letter words. But of course, the four-letter words that we use are love, life, hope, grow, free, gift, pray, play, swim. Four-letter words and tell the world to FU, capital N, capital N. They say, where did you get that? Say, Barry Shore wants to teach the world to FU, capital N, capital N and bring that forth. And use the two most powerful words in the English language three times a day consciously and conscientiously, and you’ll make a difference for yourself, your family, your friends, and all living beings. And these two words are, of course, thank you, thank you, thank you. Thanks stand for to harmonize and network kindness. So from Jodine and Barry, we’re going to give a blessing to the whole world and our blessing is to go forth, live exuberantly, and spread the seeds of joy, happiness, peace, and love. Go mad, go make a difference. Jodine, don’t go away.

Jodine Theron:

Thank you. 

Outro  

Thank you for listening to this episode of The Joy of Living Podcast. Now, that’s another step towards your healthier, happier, and wealthier life. Never hesitate to do good in the world no matter what the situation. Join us for another upbeat discussion next time at barryshore.com. And be sure to leave a rating and subscribe to the show to get more conversations like this. And remember to share it with your family and friends, too. See you on the next episode.

About Jodine Theron

Barry Shore
Jodine is an Australian who returned to her African roots. Upon marrying her Namibian husband, she decided to move to a mud hut village in a remote part of Africa. During the past three years, Jodine has studied Namibian cultures and researched social conditions that prevent Namibian communities from escaping poverty. To help lift forgotten societies out of medieval times and into the 21st century, she hopes to combine education, technology, and employment opportunities with organizations in developing countries interested in social impact partnerships.