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Uniting Ancient Wisdom and Technology

The Ambassador Of JOY, Barry Shore, is honored to Introduce You to one of the most remarkable people on the planet, today. Meet Mois Navon. Scholar, Engineer, Founding Member of Mobileye (TM) , designer of the EyeQ System on a Chip which is now installed in over 100 Million Cars worldwide and Saves Lives daily. Now COMBINE this with a respect and reverence for the Ancient Wisdom of the Bible and You have a heady mix of Insight, Inspiration, and Intelligent conversation. You’ll LEAN IN as Barry and Mois discuss the Future of Automotive Travel and the relevance of Ethics in Society. MUST SHARE with those You LOVE.

Listen to the podcast here:

Show Notes:

  • 00:45 – Barry’s rousing introduction
  • 14:17 – Mois Navon on Uniting Ancient Wisdom and Technology
  • 24:40 –
  • 41:55 –
  • 52:21- Barry’s Interesting Wrap-up

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Barry Shore:

I can’t think of anybody that I want to share with you that inspires noble deeds more than the amazing the wonderful, fantastic Rabbi Mois Navon. Mois, please say hello to 362,890 people around the world. 

Mois Navon:

Hello.

Barry Shore:

He’s low-key, he’s an engineer. We’ll talk about that in just a moment. But if I started telling you all the amazing things about Rabbi Mois Navon, we’ll drop the rabbi for the moment, it would take up the rest of the hour so I’m not going to. I’m just going to tell you three quick data points. Number one, he is a God-centered engineer. Number two, his engineering has given him a path from the JPL, Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California to a place in Israel called Mobileye. So, he is literally a driving force and that’s an intended pun, a driving force in the autonomous vehicle revolution. And number three, he is deeply involved in what we call, for want of a better term, ancient wisdom. It’s the Torah but to the world, it’s ancient wisdom, literally handed down from the Creator to humanity to enable us to live both physically, mentally, and spiritually fulfilled lives. So, that is an introduction wonderful Mois. Let’s jump right in and talk about you as a God-centered engineer, and what you did and are doing with this thing called the autonomous vehicle revolution.

Mois Navon:

In terms of engineering, I designed the chip, it basically is the platform for all the algorithms that do the image processing, the control of the vehicle. That’s the engineering side. I would say the God-centered side is that I’m doing it in the middle of Jerusalem. And I’m trying to help all the Jews that are here be proud of their heritage and connect to the values that we’ve been carrying around with us for thousands of years.

Barry Shore:

This is wonderful. So, let’s talk a little bit more about Mobileye, not as a company, but as a spearhead of the autonomous vehicle revolution because it touches deeply on the ethical aspects. Now, obviously, people go into business with a profit motive. But you have demonstrated that profit is spelled two ways. P-R-O-F-I-T and P-R-O-P-H-E-T. So, because you want to be a prophetic prophet of profit what we want to do is see this large item, big, hulking piece of metal, a lot of it’s plastic these days, but still traveling along at a very high speed, some even that’s only 30 miles an hour up to 60, 70, 80, and causing potentially all kinds of havoc. And yet what Mobileye does, is literally save lives. In other words, it is the forerunner of that which will probably be existing on the roads within the next decade or two that will enable not just driverless cars, which in itself is quite futuristic but the ability to save lives, and therefore create more benefit in life. So, talk to us about this autonomous vehicle revolution, and is it real, Mois, or is it still science fiction?

Mois Navon:

So first of all, let’s talk about the real. On the road today there’s a thing called Adas, advanced driving assistance systems. And those basically mean that we can do all kinds of control in the car in order to already save lives. So for example, there’s a thing called AEB, automatic emergency braking. If we see that there’s an accident about to happen we put on the brakes. And that has already been in cars for at least 10 years. I mean, very, very slowly. But today, we just celebrated the 100,000,000th chip. There are 100 million cars driving with this system in it, which puts on the brakes before an accident happens. It’s known as LKA, lane keeping assist. It keeps you in your lane. Many times accidents happen because people drift out of their lane. This keeps the car in the lane unless you signal unless you make a move on your steering wheel. There are many other features. Amnon Shashua is currently the CEO and one of the founders of the company, at the celebration said that there’s probably no other organization in the world that is saving as many lives as Mobileye today. That’s insane. And that’s already before autonomous vehicles. Now, autonomous vehicles have what is known as five levels. So basically level one, two is the driver assistance systems. And then level three allows you to take more control of the car, people are taking less control. And finally, level five is really what everybody imagines is the science fiction where you basically go to sleep or eat or watch a movie and you get to where you need to go. Level five is definitely in the works and is being worked on today. I personally can’t take a guess but I can tell you what the people in the industry are saying, they’re looking at 2035, 2040, something like that. I read an analysis of the RAND Corporation and they did a study. They said, how good do these autonomous vehicles need to be before it’s worth putting them on the road. Do they need to be almost as good as people, as good as people, better than people, how much better? Basically, they found out that the minute we get people out of the car, meaning away from the steering wheel and the driving controls, we will start saving lives no matter how bad the technology is. Now, of course, we’re not going to put it on the road with the technology not being as perfect as it can. Because people have already become accustomed to having people kill people in cars. They’re not accustomed, and they won’t tolerate computers killing people in cars. And so, we need to be orders of magnitude better than people before we’re going to put these on the road. But we are definitely on the road to doing that. I mean, there are many, many multiple sensors that are being designed. And there are many people, and corporations that are working on it, we’re close.

Barry Shore:

So, let’s just unpack because you gave a lot of acronyms. By the way, for those people who joined us regularly, you have over 350,000 people every week, and now up to almost 370,000 today, Mois. You don’t have to remember anything he said. Just go to my website barryshoe.com, all the information about Mois and everything he’s doing and such will all be there. So, you don’t have to write it down feverishly. Remember what he said. And of course, what we’d like you to do is share this with five people. That’s it. Not 50, not 100. Okay, if you want to that’s fine. But everybody share with five people that way we’re touching a million and a half people. Because what you’re hearing here is transformative. You see information by itself it’s just data. What the key is how do you transform data into the ability to be of service on the planet? And that’s really what Mois is about, what Mobileye is about with a profit motive. I think I read in something that you said Mois or wrote, that car manufacturers care about making money. That’s all they care about. The narrow niche that’s up to them. And people care about not killing people but it’s up to them. What we want to do, of course, is to maximize this transport system because that’s really what a car is, and make people aware that this is just as useful and beneficial as their laptop, or their cell phone. In other words, their smartphone is a computer. Nobody has any problems with using that, as a matter of fact, they use it too much while they’re driving. They text and they drive. What we want to make people aware of is that the car is not a car, it’s a computer. As you said, we can’t tolerate computers killing people or injuring people. Humans can do it but not computers. So, the genius of what you’re doing and that’s why I asked Mois and kindly gave us his time is because Mois has fused, and I happen to like fusion more than fission, fuse together this remarkable process called, for want of a better term, ethics with the technological evolution or revolution. Because it’s really an evolution. It’s been going on for hundreds of years. And that’s really what you’re about, and when I think everything that you focus on is about is that how do we integrate, they are not in any way contradictory. And they’re not like oil and water, they are in fact, more of great vinaigrette to infuse together the vision of the world as a created place with humans literally designed by the Creator, the greatest engineer of all, to be able to bring about that which everybody wants, which is peace, happiness, joy, and love. So, let’s speak more about you and your personal journey, and how it integrates with the highest level of technology.

Mois Navon:

First, I’d like to touch on a couple of things that you mentioned, number one is the car as a transport vehicle, and how does that compare to your computer/ I read recently that somebody called the autonomous vehicle revolution the most disruptive technology to hit humanity. Okay, we can argue whether that’s true or not true. But for somebody to say that means that it’s going to be doing a lot of changes in the world that you can’t even imagine. I mean, it’s going to affect real estate. If you can go at the speed of… I mean, why do we have speed limits today? We have speed limits because people can get into accidents because they’re not looking because they need to be in control, and so they have to do that at a speed limit. Cars that are run by computers don’t need those limits. They see everything, one inch in front of them, two feet on the side of them, 10 miles in front of them, they know everything. They’re talking to all the cars around them. They can drive 200 miles an hour. There’s no problem. So now if you can drive 200 miles an hour you can live much farther from the city center and get there in half the time that you do today. So that means it’s going to affect real estate, it’s going to affect the whole industry of law and insurance. It’s going to affect transportation, people are going to stop taking airplanes for these short leaps of five hours because you can take a car. And so, you don’t have to deal with the interaction of getting to the airport and leaving the airport. The list goes on. But of course, the number one reason is, as we said, saving lives. The World Health Organization puts the number at 1.2 5 million people die on the roads every year. That’s 3400 people a day. And so, that’s going to completely change. I’m an optimist, we’ll reduce it to zero. Okay, it’s not going to be zero, there will still be people that will run in the streets and some bugs and so forth. But we’re talking about orders of magnitude less than that number. And so, what I wanted to just say with this is that the car is a completely transformative industry. It’s not just like a computer, it’s far more, and it’s going to touch people in ways that they couldn’t even imagine. And so, that’s really I think the main point that I wanted to say from what you had mentioned before.

Barry Shore:

Let me put you on pause for just a moment because I want to narrow it down to, as you said, the human condition. In addition to people being able to go faster, safer, and more economic because we have a fuel that might be different also. But let’s talk about the bane of the existence of cars on the road, traffic. I’m imagining that by definition if the chip can do, not the chip, but all of the processes that there won’t be these traffic jams. In other words, you’ll have flowing in the [unintelligible: 21:55] say, look like the human body. You don’t have a traffic jam with blood in your heart unless, of course, you have a stoppage and such. But that’s a rare thing. But you have things flowing. In other words the ability to service, not just industries, but city centers, in other words, trucks. Trucks have the ability for things that deliver. So everything [crosstalk: 22:18].

Mois Navon:

Absolutely. Not only that, the cost of goods is going to go down. If you can have trucks driving 24/7 across the country and at a fraction of the cost, you don’t have a driver, you don’t have hotel stops, I mean, everything changes. They’re talking about freight training trucks one after the other. So, you have all the wind resistance, and so that reduces the cost as well. We can go on and on about it. But I wanted to touch on the point that you said about ethics. And so, there’s definitely no contradiction, as a matter of fact, ethics, religion, Einstein, I think said it very well, I love to quote him. He said religion without science is blind. But science without religion is lame. And what he’s saying is that science can tell us what we can do but not how we should do it, and not why we should do it. And so, those come from religion that gives us a purpose, a meaning, and religion has expanded out into what’s called ethics. They’re secular ethics, and because Nietzsche declared God dead, and so people are trying to come up with their own ethics is a different story. But in any case, you need ethics to guide technology. That’s actually one of the things that I’m working on right now is I’m putting together a university course on the ethics of artificial intelligence and big data. And there are huge questions that are coming up. How do we regulate this? How should we regulate this? What is the right thing to do with all of this technology?

Barry Shore:

So, let’s just touch on a couple of things. You mentioned the ability for driverless trucks on the road. 24/7. So, I was born in an area, again we have a worldwide audience, [unintelligible: 24:18] in a place called New England. And New England in the winter time has snow and it’s cold and the roads are broken up, all kinds of stuff. Are you telling us that with the capabilities that you see at the moment and let’s project, 5, 10, 15 years if we can, that even under what we’ll call harsh conditions that still in all these transport devices will be much safer and much more capable than they are than with drivers?

Mois Navon:

First of all, I think that any technology that we put on the road is going to be safer for the drivers, to err is human. And they air all the time. So, I think that the amount of errors that could happen in a computer that’s been completely debugged and so forth is far less. Now, in terms of harsh conditions, basically, that relates not so much to the control of the car but to the sensors that are being used in the car. Like, we need to be able to see through fog, we need to be able to see through clouds, we need to be able to see through rain and snow and all that kind of stuff. So, there are many different types of sensors. One of the sensors that I have some friends that are developing is called SWIR, short wave infrared. Short wave infrared is used by the military, it’s used in different places. It basically allows you to see through fogs, clouds of dust, and fleet in ways that you can’t see it with visually. So those sensors are being developed. Now, in terms of the snow on the ground, so now that’s less than an issue of sensors as it is an issue of traction, and being able to drive. In terms of being able to map ourselves, we have GPSs, and we have all the sensors so we know where we are but can a truck drive through the snow? Those are mechanical issues that you put on chains or whatever, there might be too much snow and so the car can’t go through it. But that’s less related to the computing, sensing, and controlling aspects.

Barry Shore:

Thank you for delineating so we have an idea because again, I grew up in those conditions. So when I think about it, that’s what is. You have to [crosstalk: 26:38].

Mois Navon:

I just wanted to mention that I have a friend at MIT that they’re working on a sensor that they can see through the snow, they can see the ground through the snow. So again, you can see but can you move the vehicle? That’s a mechanical question,

Barry Shore:

By the way, going just on a tangent only because I love this particular flood fill individual from decades back, his name is Buckminster Fuller, and to people in the world, we call Bucky. I don’t know if you ever read any of his stuff or seen anything. You don’t even know Bucky Fuller?

Mois Navon:

I do not. Sorry.

Barry Shore:

Mois, I’m happy to give you this gift. But one of the reasons I mentioned him is because in the 1930s he built a car called the Dymaxion car, which worked with three wheels, it was designed with three wheels, and you could shift those three wheels so you could park in a space going sideways. 

Mois Navon:

Interesting. 

Barry Shore:

Now, there were many reasons why it didn’t catch on. And one of them happened to be that tire manufacturers didn’t like him because you just took away a quarter of my product. Thank God there are many things. Now, let’s just talk about the most obvious one today, which is a Tesla. This is really fun because the richest human being on the planet, richer than anybody in the history of the world, became the richest person as he says, he didn’t invent the electric car, and he reinvented it. It was the forerunner before the internal combustion engine, there was an electric car because it made more sense. You had Edison, you had Tesla, etc., etc. But what Elon Musk was able to do was to reinvent the process and begin the transformational process, which you’re spearheading now with Mobileye and the autonomous vehicle situation, because really what it did, is it now put into the minds of most human beings well, yeah, look what’s possible. In other words, with cloud computing, and the ability to have in your hand a device called a smartphone that is more powerful than any computer from 30 years ago, nobody would have dreamed of it, and Tesla and Google pushing their autonomous vehicles. So it’s now becoming not just in science fiction it is on the ground, and it’s real. And as you just said, 100 million Mobileye chips are out in the world.

Mois Navon:

I would like to make a distinction, though. The electric vehicle definitely is coming. As you know, obviously, Tesla is selling and they’re here. And when will we be completely electric is an issue of infrastructure and so forth. But that’s definitely where the industry is going. However, that’s a separate technology that mobilizes control or Google’s control of the car. There’s the control aspect where I don’t care if we’re using a steam engine. We’re basically providing the sensors and the control and making sure that we’re going where we need to go. The engine where there’s a combustion engine or electric engine is something completely separate. It turns out that you’re 100% right that they’re being developed in parallel, and they’ll probably hit around the same time. When I mean hit, I mean that there’ll be ubiquitous throughout the world. And people won’t have combustion engines and they won’t be pressing on the gas, brakes, and steering wheel themselves.

Barry Shore:

And this convergence, by the way, is so wonderful because it is bringing to the forefront in people’s minds the possibility. That’s the genius of it, it’s the possibility. Look, I’m 73 years on this planet. When we were kids, let’s say 16 when I first got my license, we all dreamed about wouldn’t it be cool if you get on the road, and we could just turn our seats around and we could talk like you’re in a car on a train. That was always the idea. We thought about it. Dick Tracy had a watch also. But you don’t even know Dick Tracy. That’s a different story. I’ve got so many questions people want to ask and such but we’re going to take just a quick break because we have sponsors that love us. And that helps us support the show. So, we’re going to be right back with more Mois Navon and insights into the future about God, technology, and life. Don’t go away. We’ll be right back after these brief messages. 

Barry Shore:

Good day beautiful, bountiful, beloved immortal beings, and good-looking people, and you’re good looking. Because you’re always looking for and finding the good. Our cup runneth over with good in the being called Rabbi Mois Navon and he’s talking about the [unintelligible: 34:43], how should we say it, the blending of God ethics, engineering, innovation for the benefit of all. Isn’t that one of the most ubiquitous items on the planet? Not just your cell phone, an automobile, we’ll call it a transport vehicle. We’ll maybe give it a new name, isn’t that interesting, Mois. It may be called something different when your kids and my grandkids are fully grown. I don’t know, they might call it a camel. A Gamal means that which brings forth benefit. It gives over hesed, it gives over goodness. So, as we were talking before the break, Mois has told us about a couple of things. Number one, there are now over 100 million chips that are using Mobileye technology, they’re saving people’s lives, and they’re in cars. And it makes a difference in people’s lives. Because unfortunately, 3400 people a day around the planet are killed, not just die. They’re killed. This is worse than any pandemic if it continues like this. That’s number one. Number two, I want everybody to understand that the company that Mois worked with and for Mobileye, he was the 16th hire, I believe, was bought in 2017 by Intel for $15 billion. And that was a tiny price because it’s now worth three, fourfold that. But here’s what gets also very interesting. One of the sponsors we have is called Talk space, and they talk about stress. Because stress is one of the most ubiquitous problems we all face in life, is that correct, Mois? Stress, everybody faces it. And when you’re in the process of driving someplace, I think stress is exacerbated, it’s increased no matter what situation. Even if you’re just driving around the country road with your top-down on a beautiful fall day. There is stress all around because you’re on the road, especially if it’s under difficult circumstances. With the ability for cars to be automated, and driven by a computer, imagine stress levels go down. The human condition becomes more fluid, more beneficial. The intangible benefits are remarkable. So, I want to ask you please talk to us about a partnership that I think you said Mobileye has with BMW is bringing out a fully automated vehicle. Is that true?

Mois Navon:

Yeah, absolutely. Mobileye has a lot of contracts with different people. The reason that I referred once in one of my talks about BMW is because they’re the first ones who made a contract with us, and Intel at the time before they bought us to bring a fully commercially available autonomous vehicle within the next year or so. Today, there are a lot of taxi pilot programs that are being done around the world. Next summer, there’s supposed to be an autonomous vehicle pilot program for taxis in Tel Aviv, Paris, I believe in New York, in Korea, all over the world, they’re companies that are signing up to do these pilot programs are being in a very specific area, inferred for specific drives, and that will allow us to really get to the next stage of autonomous vehicles.

Barry Shore:

Because if these happen, I guess you’re going to call them Robo taxis or something like that. 

Mois Navon:

Yes. That’s what they are called.

Barry Shore:

And then, not only will they be available when people go in and out and such like that but the data that will be collected from this enormous amount of data that needs to be crunched, worked on, and understood will allow, as you said, to get to level four.

Mois Navon:

[Inaudible: 38:40] and level five. But the thing is that I think the data that’s going to be collected, I mean, there’s part of it is what actually helps the autonomous vehicle drive. Mobileye has a system, which does the dynamic mapping. That means that there are cameras looking out the front windshield, and so as the car is driving it’s uploading to the cloud what it sees, and then we build a new map. Google made a street map, Street View, and they drove around the world. They did it once, or they did it twice. They have to renew it. We do it every second. Every car that’s driving that has the camera in it is uploading the data and we’re rebuilding maps. If there’s a pothole that people are going around we feed that to the next car and it goes around automatically. So, that’s data collection that enables or further enables autonomous vehicles, autonomous driving but there’s a lot of data collection that’s being done that’s being sold to cities. There’s a traffic light out or there are as we said, there’s a pothole or whatever is going on in the city can be sent to all the authorities, whether it’s the police or road authorities, or whatever it is. And there are companies in Israel that are working on data collection with all kinds of different devices that are already in the car. That says where the car is, where it’s going, how fast it’s going, why is it stopping, and all that kind of stuff.

Barry Shore:

Now, can you imagine, there’s something, vehicle, whatever, we’ll call it a car for the moment, though. Instead of everybody facing the same direction that the people in the front, we’ll call it the front, could turn their seats around and be with the people in the back. Because you don’t need to have your eyes on the road anymore. The possibilities become so beneficial. You talk about trains, trucks going along in the convoys, as it were, and all the benefits from that you can do the same thing with the Amtrak in the United States or other places where there are trains now. We can have better roads, and move people. Become people movers in a different way. 

Mois Navon:

You mentioned that, if you turn the seats around, and so now we can have a little social gathering like we’re in a train car, the fact of the matter is, it’s much more beneficial than just being able to socialize. We now make everybody mobile. People that can’t see that couldn’t drive they can get wherever they want. People that are in wheelchairs that they had needed extra help, and so forth. They just put on the car, and they go where they want by themselves. The elderly, the handicapped, the little kids, everybody is just put in the car and goes where they need to go.

Barry Shore:

Do you happen to know of an incident where something terrible such as a kid running into the street after a ball that didn’t result in an injury because of Mobileye, or something like that?

Mois Navon:

I know of anecdotal stories. We got an email from a taxi driver in Las Vegas, where he was driving, he couldn’t see, and he sent us the dashcam footage, and said, thank you, you saved my life. There was this marketing guy, I think, in Peru, he was on the road, and a car was coming directly onto him. And the car beat him and he was able to see in time and move. People are constantly telling us that we saved their life. It’s crazy.

Barry Shore:

It’s so real. Because we get into this item that hurdles along at ungodly speeds, I’ll call it. Because you’re right. It’s all based on human beings who are not just prone to error, almost by definition, we are error beings. That’s part of who we are. The good news is, let’s celebrate it. In other words, remove us from being involved in stressful situations where error becomes heightened to a place where you can literally enjoy as you said, because I’ve had the experience of being in a wheelchair, of getting mobility, the possibilities are so wondrous. And that’s what I’m going to ask you, you’re basically telling us innovation is not just important, it is a necessity in a world with billions of people, we’ll call it, let’s be honest, congested cityscapes. And the ability, as you said, to now expand that real estate in a different way because the ability to get to, let’s say, a city center or something like that becomes reduced. You don’t have to put in say, well, it’s going to take me an hour and a quarter to go 22 miles because of the traffic.

Mois Navon:

We’re just scratching the surface of all the changes that will happen because of autonomous vehicles. Just think that you don’t need parking lots because they all go outside of the city and park and then come to the city in the morning and drive people around. There are many, many things that we could touch upon. But I think what I wanted to touch upon was what you said about the importance of innovation. And really, I think that’s the modus operandi of Judaism. We believe that God created the world and he left it unfinished. He left it unfinished on purpose to give us the opportunity to complete the world. And that completing of the world is being done by technology. Science and technology are not against creation, just the opposite. They’re helping to complete creation. And so, I think that really what’s happening in Israel that we become known as the startup nation is very much in our DNA of what’s known as Tikun Olam of fixing the world. Now, again, technology in the hands of the wrong people can do terrible things. So, that’s where the framework of ethics comes into the picture. But no question that innovation and creativity, I mean, Rav Soloveitchik is famous for interpreting the word Tzelem Elohim as being creative like God. There are many, many interpretations of Tzelem Elohim, and I don’t want to lock it into the image of God is one thing but he does use that as this idea that we’re basically created to be creative. And by doing so we complete the creation.

Barry Shore:

So, let’s touch upon a very delicate area. Israel, the country, great force for good that it is, in our opinion, is surrounded by hostile nations that on some level are hostile because they don’t know why. They’re hostile because that’s what they’re taught. But these hostile nations, especially one that will go unnamed for the moment, which thank God is still 1000 plus miles away, 1500 miles away. But it has armed to the teeth neighbors that are close. Is there a possibility, again, we don’t have to spend a lot of time on this but just to get a sense for me, of less stress, that some of this technology can be used, not just to see through the fog and things like that but to let’s say, repel incoming missiles, to be able to be used in such a way that lasers can be used to protect people, protect areas, etc., etc? Defensive rather than offensive.

Mois Navon:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, I’m not involved in the development of any of those kinds of weapons. But the fact of the matter is that everything that can be used to destroy can be used to help. It’s a matter of us deciding what we’re going to do with the technologies that are in our hands. You can take an airplane and fly to see your grandmother or you can fly it into a building. Every technology has its positive and its negative uses. And thank god Israel has been developing technologies and bracketing them within ethical uses since the foundation of the state.

Barry Shore:

Because as you say, it’s important, mandatory to speak it out right now. This is part and parcel of the DNA of Judaism, not Judism. Judism is the study of Judy. Judaism is the study of what we call Yahadus, the oneness of God. And when we are charged as Jews to bring forth into the world the creative modalities that will be of benefit in every aspect of life. Saving lives, bringing forth life, and let’s say with new technologies and IVF, and the ability for birth and to, let’s say, bring forth onto the planet that which we know we can do, which is in the words of Isaiah, that peace will be. That the lips of the people will say peace, peace unto those who are far and those who are near. And that’s really what we want to do, what I believe you made your life mission now. And thank God that the good Lord has given you the wherewithal in terms of monetary benefits to be able to focus your energies on these very crucial aspects as the revolution continues. Now, we talk about revolution, we’re talking about the innovative revolution of bringing forth into the world positive, purposeful, powerful, pleasant aspects. So, we only have a few more minutes because time does go by fast. In our world, we know that it’s called Torah, Umadda [unintelligible: 49:08]. Torah is, for want of a better term for people who are watching around the world who have no idea what we’re talking about, T-O-R-A-H, it’s really the first five books of Moses, the five books of the Bible, plus all the writings and the people familiar with the Psalms, and the Proverbs, and the song of songs. These are eternal aspects of life. They’re not ancient. As a matter of fact, we use the word awe. Awe. Mois is a great acronym that stands for ancient, wisdom, educates. That’s what awe stands for. And the more that one gravitates towards the awe someness of the Creator, and that information that has been given over to us to become innovative and creative, and to exploit in the most positive sense, that’s really what the Jewish nation is about, the Jewish people are about. So, I’d like us to leave on a very high note and talk about the idea of philosophy because there are really three questions in life. Who am I? Why am I here? Now, what do I do? So, it’s only a few more minutes but let’s just go to that interesting question that you had to ask when you were growing up because you did not grow up in the same mindset that you have at the moment. And you asked, who am I?

Mois Navon:

What am I doing? Correct. That’s true. Basically, that question came to me when I was about seven or eight years old, I found out that people die. And I said, so we’re not here forever so why are we here? What’s the point? Why are we here? And I didn’t get any answers at home. And I began to do what people do in LA, and just have a good time. But then I thought about the question a bit more, and I said when you die you are so gone that you don’t even know you ever existed. So, what’s the point of having a good time and running around? We need an answer. I need an answer. And I didn’t get an answer until I started working at JPL for a friend of the family, and he was a religious Jew. And he told me. He said, the Jewish people believe that there’s a purpose, we believe there’s a creator, and we believe you have a soul. And you’re here to fix the world. So that’s basically what I got onto. It took me a long time to get where I am today, that I’m actually a Rabbi. And I’m actually getting my Ph.D. in philosophy or Jewish philosophy, I should say. It’s a long path. But I really feel that this is the right path, certainly for me.

Barry Shore:

And the benefit is for the world. You see the genius of life is the power of one person, Mois. That’s really what happens. If you read the Bible, anybody who likes it, you know the story of Adam, and Eve, of course. But the point is that there was one person, the power of one person. I use it as a fun acronym, I call it dog poop. Dog poop stands for doing of good power of one person. One person standing up, reaching out a hand to another, to another, to another, to another. And that’s really what your life, thank God has been about, and what we want to do, and what we’re here to do. When you ask yourself, who am I? Now, why. And then what do I do? The exhilaration that releasing of energy literally can make a difference in the world. You can go mad. So, we have only a few more minutes. Mois, I’m going to ask you three questions, please. Are you ready? 

Mois Navon:

Okay. Yeah. 

Barry Shore:

Number one. Will you come back again?

Mois Navon:

Come back to the show? 

Barry Shore:

Yes. 

Mois Navon:

Yeah. I’m sure. 

Barry Shore:

Thank you. Number two…

Mois Navon:

If you have more questions. Yeah.

Barry Shore:

There are lots of questions. Number two, you have 80 seconds only to answer this. What is your most fervent desire?

Mois Navon:

Mashiah.

Barry Shore:

Nobody knows what that means. We have hundreds of thousands of people around the world.

Mois Navon:

It means it’s the end game. It means that the whole world recognizes that there’s a creator that we’re here to fix the world that we’re here to live in harmony. Everybody finally understands that we’re not working against each other. We’re working together for one purpose to live in happiness.

Barry Shore:

Thank you. And now the third question is, may I give you a hug in front of 372,000 people around the world? 

Mois Navon:

Of course. 

Barry Shore:

Okay. Let me tell you what hug stands for. Hug is an acronym that stands for heartfelt, unlimited giving because that’s what you’ve been talking about. Heartfelt, unlimited giving. 1-2-3 roar. And of course, you’ve been listening to The Joy of Living with your humble host Barry Shore. And everything you want to know about our amazing guest, and he is, go to barryshore.com. It’s all there. I urge you. Listen again and share this with at least five people so we’ll touch over a million and a half people around the planet. Remember you tuned in for one reason and one reason only because you care the most in the whole world about you. This show, as great as Rabbi Mois Navon is, it’s not about him, it’s not about Barry Shore, it’s about you, Y-O-U becoming the best you possible. And when you do that you make the world a better place and you live with the three fundamentals of life. Number one life, your life has purpose, you lead a purpose-driven life, you go mad, you make a difference. Number three, you unlock the power and the secrets of everyday words and terms. And the result is, you’ll be happier, healthier, and wealthier and we guaranteed it. Right, Mois. And remember, use those simple words www what a wonderful world. Smile, seeing miracles in life every day. As my eight-year-old says, seeing miracles in everyday life, create the kind of world you want to live in, causing, rethinking, as Mois has taught us about innovation. Enabling all to excel. Use four-letter words because we live in the world the positive, purposeful, powerful, and pleasant. Love, life, hope, grow, free, play, pray, swim, good. And tell the world to F U capital N capital N. What? Yes, you say Barry Shore taught me. I want to tell the world F U, capital N capital. You have to have fun in life in order to be able to bring out innovation in your life. And use the two most powerful words consciously and unconsciously three times a day from now and forever. Those words are thank you. Thank you. Thank you to harmonize and network kindness. So, our blessing from Rabbi Mois Navon and Barry Shore is to go forth, live exuberantly, and spread the seeds of joy, happiness, peace, and love. Go mad. Go make a difference. Mois don’t go away. Okay. 

Mois Navon:

Okay.

Outro  

Thank you for listening to this episode of The Joy of Living Podcast. Now, that’s another step towards your healthier, happier, and wealthier life. Never hesitate to do good in the world no matter what the situation. Join us for another upbeat discussion next time at barryshore.com and be sure to leave a rating and subscribe to the show to get more conversations like this. And remember to share it with your family and friends too. See you on the next episode.

About Mois Navon


Mois Navon is one of the founding engineers of Mobileye, where he designed the EyeQ family of SoC (System On a Chip) – the chip powering the autonomous vehicle revolution. Mois is also an ordained rabbi who has published numerous articles on Jewish law and lore as well as lecturing extensively on Jewish topics and earned the title: “Rabbi of Mobileye.” He is currently a pursuing his PhD at the department of Jewish Philosophy at Bar Ilan University where his thesis seeks to apply Jewish philosophy to address the ethical questions arising in the field of artificial intelligence. In this vein, he is also teaching a course on “Ethics in Big Data and Artificial Intelligence” at Ben Gurion University and Yeshiva University. His lectures and writings can be found on his website: www.divreinavon.com.